Category Archives: sculpture

Five Cuts

Malcolm’s curved canvases are worked on as three dimensional objects. However, rather than considering the interplay between solid and space – as a sculptor does, his process returns to the ‘flat two dimensional picture plane’ (the switch from 3D to 2D). Working in this way creates reciprocal and distinct marks as a single expression. An aesthetic that is only possible through the use of a curved surface. So, when finally we observe it on a two-dimensional picture plane a different aesthetic emerges – we are entangled within the physical world but paradoxically we may only be aware of one (flat) reality. Hence, how one mark may lead to many more.

As an example, ten cuts appear in the painting below. Therefore, if the truth is that only five single expressions were made at the one time, then how is it that we now can see ten? The reason this can occur is because the surface geometry was in a different state when it was cut, i.e., it was curled up so that two layers were penetrated at the same time. So, the flattening of the linen occurred after the event.

Five Cuts: Belgian linen, hand-sized with rabbit-skin glue on the reverse side, 100% cotton fabric colours, mounted to a professional quality frame.

What we observe

The raw linen (front) shows a row of 5 split open cuts at the top with another similar row below them. Appearing through each of the cuts is 5 brightly coloured fabrics, each lining up with their corresponding cuts.

The artist’s hand-sizing (rabbit-skin glue) on the reverse side, aids in turning the split edges inside itself – leading the eye into the open spaces. Also, the broad brushstrokes made with the glue, can be seen to appear to seep through the linen fabric in places, a process of over-soaking, through the back (now the front), adding to the interest (human expression) and texture of the overall surface.

Close-up of several cuts (splits) in the linen surface. The edges of the linen have turned inside itself.

Coming events

SALA Festival 2021
1 – 31 August 2021
 
Monday – Friday: 10am – 5pm

Opening event
Sunday, 15 August, 12 – 4pm

Malcolm Koch’s art space
Visit Malcolm Koch’s personal studio and art space. See a range of paintings on display and stored at the premises.

Monday – Friday: 10am – 5pm
44 Nelson Street, Stepney 
8362 2088 or mobile 0419 864 987

More about Malcolm Koch

On the foreshore — Brighton Jetty Sculptures, 2020

I’m proud to have two of my pieces, Close To Water and Quantum Sunray selected to be included in this annual event.

Each year, Brighton Jetty Sculptures, raises funds for the Brighton Surf Life Saving Club volunteers. On display for 12 days, don’t miss out on seeing over 200 sculptured works by many South Australian and national Artists.

Entered under the newly developed category, Relief/Wall-hung Sculpture, I believe this describes what my work is about.

Patritti Brighton Jetty Sculptures
January 22 to February 2, 2020
Brighton Beach, South Australia
Open 8—8pm most days
www.brightonjettyclassicsculptures.com

Close To Water, detail.
Front on view: Close To Water, oil paint on JPP Synthetic, 905 gsm. Floating on silver acrylic-mirror strips and adhered to a 3mm back panel with 12mm spacers, 789h x 1072w x 40d mm
Square Root of an Expression (Quantum Sunray), detail, 824h x 732w x 40d mm
Front on view: Square Root of an Expression (Quantum Sunray), Oil paint on JPP Synthetic, 905 gsm. Floating on silver acrylic-mirror strips and adhered to a 3mm back panel with 12mm spacers, 824h x 732w x 40d mm

You will find my work in the large white marquee. Located on Bindarra Reserve which is on the northern side of the Brighton Surf Life Saving Club.

My artist statement and description of the work: My curved canvases are worked on as three dimensional objects. However, rather than considering the interplay between solid and space as a sculpturist does, my forethought is to return to the ‘flat two dimensional picture plane’. As this reflects our ingrained version of reality – that we are tied to a flat universe yet entangled with all its probabilities in the vastness of infinite space.

A different aesthetic is created on curved canvases

Helium Sculpture (contemplation side): A double-sided painting that can be hung either side. Why? Because structural expressions are made on both sides of the canvas at the same time.
Reverse side of painting reveals my working notes, processes and thoughts
Helium Sculpture (reverse side): This side reveals my working notes, processes and thoughts. Middle right side of diagram: This illustrates how reciprocal marks can eventuate on curled surfaces. Creating a network of emptiness (one expression) that when unraveled remain bonded to the flat two dimensional picture plane.

Curved canvases

Since 2004, I have been developing the idea that a different kind of aesthetic is created when events are deployed on curved canvases. Marks created in this way take on the form of the geometric profile.

The curved canvases are worked on as three dimensional objects. However, rather than considering the interplay between solid and space as a sculpturist does, my forethought is to return to the ‘flat two dimensional picture plane’. As this reflects our ingrained version of reality — that we are tied to a 2D universe yet entangled with all its probabilities in the vastness of infinite space.

I call this approach Membrane Art. As it is the curved canvas surfaces that creates the basic structure for each work of art. Only when it is unraveled and stretched-out does the aesthetic emerge as a network of expressions.

Membrane Art is inspired by the present context of a ‘multi-dimensional’ universe and the way nature itself could be. An aesthetic thought that I continue to evolve.

Helium Sculpture along with 9 other pieces are on display at Little Bang Brewing until August 15, 2019.

Mirrored Space Exhibition at Little Bang Brewing. A different aesthetic is created on curved canvases.

Echo Reflections

Oil on JPP Synthetic, set off a blue-mirrored back panel with 12mm spacers.

Just one of my pieces that may be exhibited at Little Bang Brewing’s new exhibition space. Details to come.

Preamble

In the 1950s and 1960s, Lucio Fontana gave us a new and radical concept of space. His gestural expressions of ’buchi and tagli’ (holes and cuts) called for a new art form that reflected and responded to the present-day’s understanding of space and time — he called this work ‘spatialism’. Especially with his sharp edge cutting of the canvas, for which he is famously known, he was able to show that you can extend the 2D object into a 3D conceptual one. His work created an image through the direct engagement of both the canvas’s physical properties and the space that exists around it. At no stage did he call what he was doing…painting. It was a ‘spatial concept’ with the objective of forcing us to think about the role of the surrounding space.

Today, as we try to grapple with our understanding of the cosmos, what I call ‘Quantum Brushstrokes’ aims to reflect our times but may in fact be an extension of Fontana’s idea. However, what distinguishes my work from his is that the mark-making events have been prominently created on curved structures. That is, all my works are structurally created in the 3 dimensional form before I bring them back to the two dimensional flat picture plane we now observe. So rather than the surface exposing time and space, I’m tying us to it. By creating reciprocal markings, distinct cavities develop, akin to an echo, that could not be achieved unless some sort of curvature construct was involved. 

So when you observe any of my works, even though the geometric conditions may have change form, you can never alter their uniqueness nor their fate to remain tied to the two dimensional reality of the picture plane. A truth about the human condition — that we are trapped on the edge of a 2D universe yet entangled in all its probabilities in the vastness of infinite space.

Helium Sculpture

Distinct and reciprocal cavities develop when mark making events are created on curved structures. So that when it is transformed to the flattened observed form, a truth about the human condition emerges – that we are tied to a 2D universe yet entangled in all its probabilities in the vastness of infinite space.

This double-sided framed sculpture will go on display at my coming exhibition at Little Bang Brewing (25 Henry Street, Stepney, South Australia). Details to be confirmed.