Category Archives: Art prize

Malcolm Koch finalist, Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize, Waterhouse finalist, Waterhouse Art Prize, SALA Art Prize

Don’t miss the ‘hole’ exhibition!

I feel very honoured to be a finalist in the Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize, 2018. This is the third time I’ve been selected as a finalist for this prestigious exhibition.

My entry ‘Oxygen Captured’ represents a single oxygen atom. I hope that by representing this atom at a human scale it will highlight the precious qualities oxygen has for our existence. Above is my ‘blueprint’, with additional working notes, that appears on the reverse (back) side of the artwork — it’s not intended to be shown. I’m presenting it here for those who may be interested in my ‘hole’ working method and to illustrate how I paint from both sides of the canvas as one ‘complete’ expression — an aesthetic that I call Quantum Brushstrokes

The front side will go on display, with all the other selected finalists’ works, at the South Australian Museum from June 8 until August 5, 2018. When it’s available, you can see my actual entry piece by clicking the following link: Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize 2018

Here is my ‘full’ Artist Statement:

The complex science surrounding the properties of a particle (ref. Atomic No.8) is fundamental to the formation of the conditions that promoted life on our oxygenated earth.

The constituent parts of an atom – protons, neutrons and electrons are represented by drill holes through a furled canvas (protons, neutrons) and sawn slashes (electrons). When the canvas is re-stretched to 2D form the drill holes and saw cuts create equidistant opposing “marks” within the white surface as in the inner vastness of atomic space.

The wave-like furling of the canvas, and the passage of drill and saw marks through it, when arranged in this fashion result in the kind of symmetry that is reminiscent of atomic structure and dynamic particle relationships that are the basis of all matter.

Malcolm Koch

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Quarks that spin ‘up or down’ — detail

Embossed quark hole showing the anti-clockwise spin direction of the membrane. Detail of Lithium mesh (bottom right – 1 of 3 holes).

Debossed quark hole showing the clockwise spin direction of the membrane. Detail of Lithium mesh (bottom right – 2 of 3 holes).

Embossed quark hole showing the anti-clockwise spin direction of the membrane. Detail of Lithium mesh (bottom right – 3 of 3 holes).

Lithium mesh: This painting/sculpture shows a number of drill holes and saw cuts. The bottom right set of 3 ‘quark’ holes (single quarks shown above) were all created at the same time or rather as one complete expression. Yet we may observe both ‘up and down’ qualities on the 2D picture plane. This is possible when the geometric state of the membrane is altered (curled) in a way to allow such events to occur before it is then unravelled to the 2D flat plane for observation – the principle idea behind Membrane Art. For more information see Quantum_Brushstrokes or Membrane Art.

Lithium mesh was highly commended at the Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize, 2016. Synthetic polymer on JPP Synthetic, 566gsm, 1020w x 760h mm

 

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Working notes of ‘Lithium mesh’ (Spatial Lithium)

Lithium-mesh_notes-on-back_Malcolm Koch

The photograph above is of my working notes which appears on the reverse side of my ‘Highly Commended’ art piece, Lithium mesh. Although you will not see this side of it on display at the prestigious Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize 2016 exhibition – it shows my thoughts and the science of my working method. For more information about the science behind it, see the following blog (Proton brushstrokes) or download the PDF file Quantum brushstrokes

To see the finished mounted work, visit the South Australian Museum from 10 June until 31 July 2016. Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize_Gallery

Lithum-mesh_Malcolm_Koch_2016

Artist statement of work: Lithium mesh
Quarks & leptons are the building blocks of matter — I’ve created a series of events, using curls & waves, that interpret a geometric construct of a particle’s properties. The curved structures create a framework that allows for connections and entangled systems to manifest. Finally the surface is flattened to 2D-form for observation. The viewer experiences the unravelled results — challenging perceptions that things are often not what they appear to be — a tangible expression of how nature at the very small scale may be formed, by complicated structures and events that are concealed from us.

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Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize – finalist and highly commended

Lithum-mesh_Malcolm_Koch_detail3

Lithium mesh (detail): A series of quantum brushstrokes.

For the second time running, I’m a finalist in the prestigious Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize 2016. Prize winners will be announced at the South Australian Museum at 10:30am on Thursday 9 June 2016. Whatever happens, I’m thrilled to be part of the exhibition to be held at the South Australian Museum from 10 June – 31 July 2016. For more info: http://www.waterhouse.samuseum.sa.gov.au/

More about Quantum brushstrokes

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Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize 2014

‘In art and science we are now in a delta, at the end of the long flow of progress. In a delta there is no clear direction but there may be many choices. The best we can do is to enjoy the choices that we have and to be genuinely and creatively eclectic’. Robert Bateman. MA#41, Finalist and Highly Commended, Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize 2014. South Australian Museum 

MA#41_twitter

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Highly commended at Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize

I’m very happy to announce that I was Highly Commended for work MA#41 at this year’s Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize. With the high quality of work on display, this is a very satisfying achievement. It does mean that my work will form part of a tour to the National Archives of Australia in Canberra later in the year.

The exhibition opens this weekend at the SA Museum: www.bit.ly/1jV37X2

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Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize…finalist

I’ve been selected as a finalist in the prestigious Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize for 2014 (Category A – Paintings).

This highly competitive event is one of Australia’s most prestigious art competitions. With a total prize pool over $100,000, makes it one of the richest arts’ prize in Australia, attracting many national and international entries.

The competition invites artists to investigate the world around them and present their own perspective on natural science. Since, my work (Membrane Art) has its basis in ‘science’, as you can imagine, I’m just thrilled to be recognised.

Prize winners will be announced at a media call at the South Australian Museum at 10:30am on Thursday 24 July 2014.

Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize

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