Author Archives: Malcolm Koch

SALA Festival 2022 – Entry number 117

The South Australian Living Artist (SALA) Festival is a statewide annual event showcasing a range of artists throughout August. It was established in 1998 to promote and celebrate the many talented visual artists in South Australia. The aim was -and remains- to extend visual arts audiences, and as an umbrella organisation, to have a continued policy of inclusiveness allowing all South Australian visual artists of any level and working in any medium to play a part.

After several years of participation, this year Malcolm Koch’s exhibition will showcase a range of works including his latest series called ‘Double Story’. The idea where one ‘expression’ creates many — intertwined within the same plane and its reverse side — with an equal degree of value. Being able to interchange to the ‘other’ side creates a co-dependent relationship from one to the other which maybe viewed as completing the experience.

That said. Not getting the whole picture in one go is part of the human condition. This work offers a glimpse of the whole. However, we can only observe the work from one side at a time. Therefore, by describing something that’s the same for both sides, regardless of which side you‘re on is a realisation that our inability to engage with its entirety is real. Nevertheless, it is through the inverse (reciprocal expressions) that truth is revealed. That there are two sides to every story, yet, it is all one.

Malcolm's SALA guide entry
SALA guide entry number 117

SALA Festival 2022
1 – 31 August 2022
Mon–Fri: 10am – 5pm

Opening event 7 August (Sunday) 12 – 4pm
RSVP mobile 0419864987

Malcolm Koch’s art space
Visit Malcolm Koch’s personal studio and art space. See a range of paintings on display and stored at the premises.

Monday – Friday: 10am – 5pm
44 Nelson Street, Stepney
8362 2088 or mobile 0419 864 987

Online salesThis entry was posted in Malcolm Koch on  by Malcolm Koch. Edit

Double Story series

This current series of work is formed by using the topography of the curved canvas. I apply what I call ‘quantum brushstrokes’ to make structural marks – which cannot be achieved on a flat picture plane.

Close-up of Double Story_No4 in transition to the other side (Double exposured image). Oil on synthetic board.

One ‘expression’ creates many — intertwined within the same plane and its reverse side — with an equal degree of value. Being able to interchange to the ‘other’ side creates a co-dependent relationship from one to the other which maybe viewed as completing the experience.

That said. Not getting the whole picture in one go is part of the human condition. This work offers a glimpse of the whole. However, we can only observe the work from one side at a time. Therefore, by describing something that’s the same for both sides, regardless of which side you‘re on is a realisation that our inability to engage with its entirety is real. Nevertheless, it is through the inverse (reciprocal expressions) that truth is revealed. That there are two sides to every story, yet, it is all one.

Currently, unframed, these oil paintings comes with a framing solution. Please talk to the artist.

One side of Double Story No 6. Oil on synthetic board.
The transition to the other side.
The other side of Double Story No 6, with structural markings of an equal degree of value. Oil on synthetic board.

SALA Festival 2022
1 – 31 August 2022
Mon–Fri: 10am – 5pm

Opening event 7 August (Sunday) 12 – 4pm
RSVP mobile 0419864987

Malcolm Koch’s art space
Visit Malcolm Koch’s personal studio and art space. See a range of paintings on display and stored at the premises.

Monday – Friday: 10am – 5pm
44 Nelson Street, Stepney
8362 2088 or mobile 0419 864 987

Online sales

Slice of Life

Malcolm’s curved canvases are worked on as three dimensional objects. However, rather than considering the interplay between solid and space – as a sculptor does, his process returns to the ‘flat two dimensional picture plane’ (the switch from 3D to 2D). Working in this way creates reciprocal and distinct marks as a single expression. An aesthetic that is only possible through the use of a curved surface. So, when finally we observe them on a two-dimensional picture plane a different aesthetic emerges. Demonstrating that past events don’t disappear but an alternative purpose and meaning eventuates in the transformation of flattening the profile from one environment to another – setting in motion a further process of deep reflection or meditation.

In the example blow, ten ‘cuts’ appear on the picture plane. However, the truth is that only five single expressions were made at the one time. So one might ask, how is it that we can now can see ten? The reason that this has occurred is because the surface geometry was in a different state when it was cut, i.e., it was curled-up, so that two layers were penetrated at almost the same time. So, the flattening of the linen as we see it now happened after the event. Hence, how one mark may lead to many.

Slice of Life: Medium – Belgian linen, hand-sized with rabbit-skin glue on the reverse side, 100% cotton fabric colours, mounted to a professional quality frame.

What we observe
The raw linen (front) shows a row of 5 split open cuts at the top with another similar row below them. Appearing through each of the cuts is 5 brightly coloured fabrics, each lining up with their corresponding cuts.

The artist’s hand-sizing (rabbit-skin glue) on the reverse side, aids in turning the split edges inside itself – leading the eye into the open spaces. Also, the broad brushstroke expressions made with the glue on the ‘back’, appear to seep through the linen fabric in places, a process of over-soaking, through to the front. This brings texture and reinforces the human expression.

Close-up of several cuts (splits) in the linen surface. The edges of the linen have turned inside itself. Leading the observer into the space created.

Coming events

SALA Festival 2021
1 – 31 August 2021
 
Monday – Friday: 10am – 5pm

Opening event
Sunday, 15 August, 12 – 4pm

Malcolm Koch’s art space
Visit Malcolm Koch’s personal studio and art space. See a range of paintings on display and stored at the premises.

Monday – Friday: 10am – 5pm
44 Nelson Street, Stepney 
8362 2088 or mobile 0419 864 987

More about Malcolm Koch

Flatten the curve – the new normal!

Paintings on display in Malcolm Koch's art gallery.
Paintings on display in Malcolm Koch’s personal art space: 44 Nelson Street, Stepney SA.

About
Since 2004, Malcolm has been evolving this aesthetic thought: Creating events on a curved surface then unravelling it to ‘flatten the curve’. Only then is it complete for observation.

Malcolm’s curved canvases are worked on as three dimensional objects. However, rather than considering the interplay between solid and space as a sculptor does, his forethought is to return to the ‘flat two dimensional picture plane’ (the switch from 3D to 2D). Working in this way creates reciprocal and distinct marks as one expression. An aesthetic that is only possible through the advent of a curve. So when finally, we do observe it on a two dimensional flattened picture plane a different aesthetic emerges.

SALA Festival 2020
Visit Malcolm Koch’s personal studio and art space. See are a range of paintings on display and stored at the premises – by appointment only (to keep the curve flat!).

1 – 31 August 2020 
Monday-Friday: 10am – 5pm
Saturday-Sunday: 12pm – 4pm

Malcolm Koch’s art space
44 Nelson Street, Stepney 
8362 2088 or mobile 0419 864 987

More about Malcolm Koch

SALA Festival Program

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Preamble
To me, Membrane Art is an open door to endless possibilities. Heavily dependent upon the geometric surfaces (nature) which underpins it. Yet, in the end, you never truly know what you’re going to be looking at until you unroll it (flat).

Recognising that the surface membrane creates the basic structure for the artwork is only the beginning. Results can either echo, connect and/or entangle themselves in ways that cannot be achieved in our flat dimensional world. It shows that the markings have come from somewhere else. Where expression and sculpture unite — which is why I consider this approach neither painting nor sculpture.

There certainly is a sense of freedom by working in this way. Creating a gestural response that is deeply-rooted in the present context of quantum physics yet not bound by its mathematical theorems, provides an artistic licence to explore.